The educational materials created as part of The Greatest Theft in History Educational Program support and enhance teaching about World War II in middle, high school, college, and adult learning settings. Developed by a panel of distinguished edtucators under the supervision of leading experts, this program deepens our understanding of the Second World War, its root causes, costs, and victories. The war’s events are reframed by shifting the perspective to its effect on our shared art and cultural heritage.


Our mission is to enable every school, library and place of worship to be able to afford and own The Greatest Theft in History Educational Program. The cost of just $35 per Program includes the three DVDs containing almost 9 hours of content, and featuring the award winning documentary film, The Rape of Europa, based on the acclaimed book by scholar Lynn Nicholas. It also includes access to this custom designed educational website which contains a comprehensive series of specially constructed Lesson Plans linked to film clips exclusive to this website that enable educators to spend their time on classroom teaching, not searching for teaching material.

Because this website has been constructed for use by students and teachers alike-in fact all those wishing to learn-we will include other key features such as additional footage, glossary terms, biographies, discussion questions for the classroom, art factoids, timelines, maps, Masterpieces of the Month and many other useful teaching resources. Each month additional content will be added including information gathered from other educators and students about the Program.

The Greatest Theft in History is available exclusively on this website. Our fulfillment center works as smoothly and efficiently as Amazon.
Introduction by Monuments Man, Harry Ettlinger


Harry Ettlinger, one of the last surviving Monuments Men, explains why World War II was the greatest theft in history and how this Educational Program may be used.

Riveting stories of theft and destruction balance with equally compelling stories of the heroic protection, rescue, and preservation of priceless artworks to comprise a new approach to teaching and learning about World War II.

These stories-and the significant lessons they offer-continue beyond that war and still impact us today. They are essential to forming responsible solutions to past wrongs, addressing future conflicts, averting genocidal cleansings, and tackling persistent threats to the world’s cultural heritage.

As with all teaching about war, educators are reminded to be sensitive to disturbing content. The materials in The Greatest Theft in History Educational Program should be used with forethought, particularly if they are partnered with teaching about the Holocaust or other genocides.
Neither the documentary film "The Rape of Europa" nor the supplemental educational material contain graphically disturbing images, but do present opportunities to introduce students to the complex themes of war and to the emotionally demanding content of World War II and the Holocaust. It is recommended that teachers preview the documentary, the additional footage, and the clips presented in the lesson plans prior to classroom use.

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The Monuments Men The Roberts Commission The American Council of Learned Societies The Harvard Group